31 – Daniel Haston and the White County, TN “Big Spring” Settlers

31 - Daniel Haston & Other White County, TN Big Spring Settlers

The area south of the Caney Fork River near the mouth of Cane Creek was a prominent settlement in the early 1800s.  It was part of White County, Tennessee prior to its inclusion into newly formed Van Buren County in 1840.  The abundance of water sources in that area was probably a major reason that early land-seeking settlers found the region so attractive.  And since the land was covered in canebrakes, it was much easier to clear than timbered land.

 A large perpetual spring flows into Cane Creek approximately one half mile before Cane Creek itself empties into the Caney Fork River.  Early documents refer to this feeder stream as “Big Spring” or “Big Spring Branch.”  The spring is certainly not impressive in the length of the stream, but the amount of crystal clear water that flows out of the mouth of the spring is quite impressive.  Big Spring emerges from the base of the north side of the Cumberland Mountain and meanders only a few hundred yards before spilling into Cane Creek. 

Head of the Big Spring Branch. The spring flows out of the foot of the Cumberland Mountain, north of Spencer, TN.

The quality and quantity of this water source, must have made the land surrounding Big Spring the prime homestead location for miles up and down the south side of the Caney Fork.  Thus, we can probably assume that the families that claimed Big Spring as a focal point for their homesteads were some of the earliest settlers of that area.   

In the pioneer years of early America, neighbors, friends, and family members often moved together as a group.  At least three (but probably more) families accompanied Daniel Haston to White County and settled in a cluster of homesites around the Big Spring Branch that became known as the Haston Big Spring.  The three families were all connected to Daniel Haston but in different ways. 

The map at the top of this page clearly indicates that the four families strategically situated their claims in such a way as to provide access to the cool, clear, dependable waters of the Big Spring.  A closer look at the dates on the map suggests that the placement of these claims was a well-planned, collective effort on the part of these four pioneer families.  All four homesteads were officially located on the same day, August 28, 1807.  Although the locations of their claims were made “official” on this day, there is evidence that they were “squatters” on these pieces of land for months, if not a few years, prior to August 1807.  All four of these men, Isham Bradley, Jacob Mitchell, Joseph Haston, and Daniel Haston, signed the petition to form White County on July 22, 1806. 

“Prior to 1805-1806, legally there were no rights for persons who may have settled in present day White, Van Buren, or Warren Counties.  That land was still in fact legally the territory of the Cherokee.  These early settlers were at some risk being there, but once the land had been ceded by the Indians, these hardy occupants were possessors of prize land.  They could straightway begin the process of making entry, survey, and the issuance of a grant.”[i]

[i] Landon Daryle Medley, The History of Van Buren County, Tennessee: The Early Canebrakers (1840-1940). (Spencer, TN: published by author), 32.

The Four "Big Spring Branch" Settlers

Daniel Haston.  As far as we know, this was the first property that Daniel Haston lived on that belonged to him, even though he was more than fifty years old at this time.  He was definitely the “patriarch” of the group, since the head of the spring was on his property.

At the time the Hastons, Bradleys, and Mitchells initially settled the Big Spring area, they were probably living in constant danger of Indian attacks, since they were illegally squatting on Indian hunting lands.  Monroe Seals stated, “Even after the Treaty of Tellico there were numerous skirmishes between whites and Indians.”  One man born in White County in 1800, “told of numerous conflicts between whites and Indians during his boyhood.”[i]

[i] Seals, 5.

Although I know of no hard documentation to support the claim, there is some oral history that says a fortified station was erected on Daniel Haston’s property in order to provide protection from such attacks.  It was supposedly known in those days as the “Haston Station.”  The convenient access to Big Spring would have made it a logical place of refuge. 

Joseph Haston.  Joseph was Daniel’s 2nd son.  The Big Spring flowed 495 feet down Joseph’s northwest property line.  Joseph sold this tract to his brother David on February 15, 1809.  On September 11, 1806 David was still in Knox County settling the sale of his 111 acres to Ezekiel Baldwin for $490.00.  David’s first known appearance in White County was February 10, 1808 as a road worker, but he must have been in the county earlier enough to have been known.  Joseph was probably commissioned by David to purchase the White County land and hold it for him until he could settle his Knox County business, move to White County, and settle his family.  

Jacob Mitchell.  Although Jacob Mitchell’s land did not have direct access to the head of the spring, his property line ran along Big Spring Branch for some 1500 feet, which gave him more frontage to the stream than any of the four Big Spring area tracts.  Jacob Mitchell was a son-in-law of Daniel Haston, husband to Daniel’s daughter Lucinda.

Isham Bradley.  Isham Bradley’s relationship to the Daniel Haston family can be traced back to Knox and Blount Counties, Tennessee.  Isham was the bondsman for David Haston’s May 5, 1800 marriage to Peggy Roddy.  And David had filled the same role for Isham Bradley’s marriage to Susana Matlocks on May 13, 1798 in Blount County.  Was he a relative to the Hastons or just a friend?  Since we know he married Susana Matlocks, he must not have been a son-in-law of Daniel Haston, as was Jacob Mitchell.  Whatever the relationship was, it was strong enough for him to travel to the wilderness of middle Tennessee in order to settle adjacent to the Haston family (even before his marriage bondsman friend David arrived to the area).  

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June 14-27, 2023 – Hiestand/Haston European Heritage Tour – Terms and Conditions

2023 Hiestand-Haston Europe Tour Price and Other Details

June 14-27, 2023 - Switzerland and Rhineland Germany

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30 – Daniel Haston Family Moves Across the Cumberland Plateau

30 - Our Hastons Moved West of the Cumberland Mountain

Courtesy Tennessee State Library and Archives

Through the Tellico Treaties of October 25 and 27, 1805, Cherokee chiefs ceded to the United States a large area of Middle Tennessee.  On April 24, 1806, the October 1805 treaties were officially proclaimed by the President of the United States.  Much of Middle Tennessee, including then-future White County, was legally opened for white pioneers.  White County historian Monroe Seals noted: “After the Treaty of Tellico the country settled up rapidly.”[i]

[i] Monroe Seals, History of White County. (1935; reprinted, Salem, MA: Higginson Book Company, n.d.), 6.

The 1805 cession of land from the Cherokees is indicated by the yellow (57) section of the above map.  The Cherokee surrendered their claims “from the Kentucky line on the north to [the future towns of] Manchester and Altamont on the south, from the Tennessee River on the east to the neighborhood of Livingston, Cookeville, Smithville, and Woodbury on the west.”[i]  The ceded territory included the future locations of Sparta, Spencer, McMinnville, and Crossville.

[i] Hamer, 243-244.

Assuming Daniel was born in about 1750, the first 33 years (or so) of his life were spent in Virginia and the next 21 years (or so) were spent in Western North Carolina/East Tennessee.  He lived out the remainder of his life (22 years or so) near the confluence of Cane Creek and the Caney Fork River in what became White County, Tennessee, nearly 40 years before it became a part of northern Van Buren County. 

Exactly when Daniel moved to White County is not known. My best guess is that he left Knox County sometime between the spring of 1803 and mid-1804. I have theorized that Daniel may have made a land-hunting trip across the Cumberland Plateau sometime between October 1798 and January 1800.  That is also a guess, but there is enough evidence to give it some degree of credibility. 

In September 1788, the steep and rugged Avery Trace (also called the North Carolina Road) was opened, it began at the Clinch River and entered the Cumberland Mountain from the east through Emory Gap (near the present town of Harriman, Tennessee). The Trace was originally nothing more than a horse path, but was widened to accommodate wagons in 1795.  It crossed the Cumberland Plateau and began to descend the western slope at Standing Stone (now Monterey), then continued on to Nashville by way of Fort Blount, Dixon Springs and Winchester’s Station (now site of Gallatin). 

But a better, wider, and more direct road—a wagon road from the beginning—to Nashville was opened fourteen years later, September 1802.*  This newer road, which took a slightly more southernly route, was constructed under the leadership of William Walton, and became known as the Walton Road or Cumberland Road/Turnpike.  It was about 15 feet wide on flat land and 12 feet wide through the mountains.  On the east, it started at Southwest Point, south of Kingston, climbed up Kimbrough’s Gap, crossed the plateau through Crab Orchard, ran about four miles north of the future site of Crossville (originally Lambeth’s Crossroads), and on to Standing Stone.[i]  On the west side of the Cumberland Plateau, Walton Road passed through the sites that became Cookeville, Baxter, Carthage, Gallatin, before ending in Nashville.[ii]  It ran westward about 20 miles north of where Sparta was located four years later.

 

*This Walton Road was completed in 1801 or 1802, but was authorized in 1794 and construction began on it in 1795, beginning in Carthage, Tennessee (where William Walton lived) and working eastward.

[i] W. Calvin Dickinson, Cumberland County. (Cookeville, TN: Tennessee Technological University, 1992), 6.

[ii] John Dawson Boniol, Jr., “The Walton Road,” Tennessee Historical Quarterly, XXX, no. 4 (Winter, 1971): 403-407.

If Daniel scouted for land in Middle Tennessee in 1799 or 1800, he would probably have crossed the Cumberland Mountain on the Avery Trace.  But when he moved to his new homesite on the Caney Fork River in 1803 or 1804, he and his family and their friends would have undoubtedly travelled the Walton Road. 

The branch off of the Walton Road that turned south to Sparta was not constructed until about 1822.  So Daniel’s clan probably followed the Indian Chickamauga Path, from the Walton Road as it passed through White Plains (near now what is Algood in Putnam County) down into White County to the Caney Fork River.  Somewhere along the way, the Chickamauga Path branched in two directions.

Courtesy Tennessee State Library and Archives

The Western Branch of the Chickamauga Path/Trail ran south through Beersheba Springs, Coalmont, Tracy City, west of Jasper to the “Lower Towns” of Chickamauga Indians. The Eastern Branch ran southeast through Hickory Valley and Big Bottom, up the Cumberland Mountain, crossed Bee Creek, and on to Pikeville and probably to the Cherokee “Upper Towns,” as well as the Chattanooga-Chickamauga area.

The Eastern Branch of the Chickamauga Path crossed the Caney Fork River at Butts Ford, only about 1.7 miles upriver from the mouth of Cane Creek near the Haston’s Big Spring where Daniel and other “Big Springs” families settled.

How did Daniel Haston locate the land he and others claimed on or near the Big Spring Branch?  We can only guess.  But possibly he followed one branch of the Chickamauga Path to the Caney Fork River, then searched up or down the river until he discovered Cane Creek and the Big Spring Branch.  Or, possibly he had met Thomas Dillon in Knoxville who directed him to the Cane Creek of the Caney Fork River site.  Dillon had acquired a patent (based on Certificate #313) for 5,000 acres that included many 100s of acres in the general area where Daniel Haston settled.

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14 – Were Our Ancient Swiss Hiestands Spiritist-Pagans?

14 - Were our Ancient Swiss Hiestands Spiritist-Pagans?

Although I can’t say for sure, it is probable, that our Medieval ancestors were pagans who lived in a high-mountain area of what is now the northern edge of Canton Zug, Switzerland.  Our June 2023 Hiestand-Haston tour group will visit this area.

Image from Ancient Origins

The (Swiss) hills were alive with the sounds of witchcraft and black magic!

Many centuries before Julie Andrews and the 1965 “The Sound of Music” movie, the mountains of Switzerland were alive with very different sounds–the sounds of sorceries and incantations.  

In ancient Rome a person living in a rural area or village was called paganus.  When Christianity became generally accepted in the towns and cities of the empire, paganus (English, pagan) was used to refer to a villager who continued to worship the old gods.  “Old gods” paganism was common throughout Europe even after Christianity was introduced and spread.  As Christianity began to take root in Switzerland in the 4th century and following, pagans retreated to the highlands to avoid the control of the State and the influence of the Church.

We know that our earliest known Hiestands originated from near the village of Hutten, just below a highland area known as Gottschalkenberg.  This  broad crescent-shaped, soft-topped mountain south of Wädenswil and Richterswil was a center of ancient paganism at an elevation of 3,816 feet. 

Although you may read that Gottschalkenberg literally means “God’s servant,” schalk conveys the idea of some kind of foolery, so it translates to something like, “The mountain of God’s joke”[i] or “The mountain of God’s fools,”[ii] probably referring to the foolish pagans who lived there.

[i] Nicole Billeter, email to Wayne Haston, June 15, 2021. 

[ii] Ross Baughman, email to Wayne Haston, April 8, 2021.

Gottschalkenberg within the northern boundary of Canton Zug, overlooking Lake Zürich and the mountain side down to the lake’s south shore. 

Looking down from Gottschalkenberg to Wadenswil and Richterswil on the south shore of Lake Zurich.

From some of the early inhabitants of Finstersee, a village near Gottschalkenberg, a myth emerged to try to explain the origin of Gottschalkenberg.  It’s just one of many magical myths from the Gottschalkenberg area.

In misty, long-agos, the first humans to settle Finstersee (just 4.7 km above Hutten) cleared the land, planted their gardens and baked their first bread. Their lives proved so good that soon a crop of children crowded the only spots big enough and flat enough for play.  One from among them drew the lott, and was obliged to petition the gods for more land.

“Then clear more land! Cut the trees and dry out the swamps,” came back the only answer they got.

This advice solved their needs for a while, but when it could no longer, another envoy went out looking for the king of the devils, ready to make a deal with him.

He was glad to hear their pleas and promised to fulfill their wishes. He sent a whole troop of little devils to the top of Gottschalkenberg, where they tunneled inside it, and with their shoulders, lifted up.  The settlers of Finstersee hugged each other, drank themselves silly and danced with delight, for by stretching new hillsides into the land, more acres belonged to them now and could be put to work. The people swore their thanks and fidelity to the devil, but only learned later how much harder the work would be in every way for every day of the rest of their lives.[i]

[i] J. Ross Baughman, The Chains Rejoined, 18-19.

Photo: Zug Tourismus; 21st Century Finstersee with Gottschalkenberg in the Background

In time, some of these pagans probably came into contact with Christians and were converted to Christianity.  They came down from the highlands to the south shore of Lake Zürich, four and a half miles as an eagle flies.  They purchased hereditary rights to farm land, from the Catholic Knights of St. John, and worked in the old Wädenswil Castle and began to settle around the castle in Wädenswil and Richterswil. 

Our June 2023 Hiestand-Haston Tour Group Will Visit Beautiful Gottschalkenberg

Gottschalkenberg overlooks Lake Zurich, from the south.  The bunkers you see in the video were built there to protect Switzerland from enemy aircraft during World War II.   Amazingly, Switzerland was able to maintain its neutrality during the war and avoid bombardments by Nazi Germany and its allies. 

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July 22-23, 2022 Daniel Haston Family Heritage Days

Heritage of Daniel Haston Days - July 22-23, 2022

The First ALL Daniel Haston Family Get-Together in 200+ Years!

Events

Event #1: The “Heritage of Daniel Haston Days” reunion begins with an informal get-acquainted meeting on Friday evening, from 6:00 pm to about 8:00 pm, Central Daylight Time.  Dessert, with coffee, tea, and water will be served.  Soft drinks will be available for purchase.  This is an important part of our reunion – please plan on attending this fun time.

Event #2: We will meet on Saturday morning at 9:00 am for registration and some more planned get-acquainted time. Old Haston family photos will be on display and someone will be there to scan any of them for you.  A photographer will be available to take photos of you and your family, cousins, new friends, etc.  These photos will later be uploaded to a gallery on the Daniel Haston Family Association site for you to view and download.  White County and Van Buren County history books will be available for you to purchase.   Van Buren and White County historians will be there to answer questions.  And more! 

Event #3: At about noon, a full lunch will be catered ($14 for adults and $7 for children, ages four through age twelve as of the date of the reunion)–no cost for children three and younger.  This price covers the Saturday dinner snack as well.

Event #4: There will be a program for adults and a program for children which will focus on a brief overview of the history of our Haston family.

Event #5: Saturday afternoon will feature a tour of 12 historic Haston-related sites in the area.  A map and booklet with information on all of these sites and their relationship to the Daniel Haston family will be provided.  Participants will drive their own vehicles to these sites or car-pool together.  Guides, at some of the key sites, will be available to give brief information about the historical significance of the sites and answer questions.

Event # 6: After the completion of the tour, there will be a dinner snack provided back at the Hickory Valley Church.  We will then have a time of debriefing the tour and answering any questions about our family’s history.  We will also need help cleaning the facilities and preparing for the church’s Sunday morning activities.

Optional Events: There are no more planned events, but participants may want to visit some of the recreational and tourist sites in the area.

Additional Information

Tour of Daniel Haston Family Historic Sites

The Daniel Haston Family Historic Sites Tour Saturday Afternoon, July 22, 2022 Download Print Version To see the highlighted route on a printed copy, print in color or print in grayscale then highlight the route manually. Click on the (right side) arrow to sequence through the sites on the tour. 0 – Hickory Valley Baptist Church at 5865 Hickory Valley Rd, Sparta, TN 38583 01 – Old Union Church and Cemetery – Gravesites of many Hastons, especially descendants of David Haston. 2a – Road to Big Fork Cemetery and old church site. 02b – Sign to the “walking gate” that

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Some Lodging Options and Recreation Sites

Some Lodging Options and Recreational Sites For the July 22-23, 2022 Heritage of Daniel Haston Days Week Lodging and Recreation Fall Creek Falls State Park Fall Creek Falls State Park is one of Tennessee’s largest and most visited state parks. The park encompasses more than 29,800 acres sprawled across the eastern top of the rugged Cumberland Plateau. Laced with cascades, gorges, waterfalls, streams and lush stands of virgin hardwood timber, the park beckons those who enjoy nature at her finest. Fall Creek Falls, at 256 feet, is one of the highest waterfalls in the eastern United States. Other waterfalls within

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15 – The “Black Madonna” in the Einsiedeln Monastery

15 - Einsiedeln Abbey, Home of the Swiss "Black Madonna"

Tuesday, June 20, 2023, our Hiestand-Haston tour group will visit the largest church in Switzerland–the famous Einsiedeln Abbey.

Einsiedeln Abbey (German: Kloster Einsiedeln) is a Benedictine monastery in the village of Einsiedeln in the canton of Schwyz, Switzerland.
150,000 to 200,000 Roman Catholic pilgrims visit each year
Black Madonna of Einsiedeln

The abbey is dedicated to Our Lady of the Hermits, the title being derived from the circumstances of its foundation, for the first inhabitant of the region was Saint Meinrad, a hermit. It has been a major resting point on the Way of St. James for centuries.
 

Meinrad was educated under his kinsmen, Abbots Hatto and Erlebald, at the abbey school at Reichenau, an island on Lake Constance, where he became a monk and was ordained a priest. After some years at Reichenau, and at a dependent priory on Lake Zurich, he embraced a heremitical life and established his hermitage on the slopes of mount Etzel. He died on January 21, 861, at the hands of two robbers who thought that the hermit had some precious treasures, but during the next 80 years, the place was never without one or more hermits emulating Meinrad’s example. One of them, named Eberhard, previously Provost of Strassburg, in 934 erected a monastery and church there, of which he became first abbot.
 

The church is alleged to have been miraculously consecrated, so the legend runs, in 948, by Christ himself assisted by the Four Evangelists, St. Peter, and St. Gregory the Great. This event was investigated and confirmed by Pope Leo VIII and subsequently ratified by many of his successors, the last ratification being by Pope Pius VI in 1793, who confirmed the acts of all his predecessors.

During the Middle Ages, Einsiedeln became a popular place of pilgrimage for people from southern Germany, Switzerland, and Alsace. Meinrad’s cell became the shrine of the Black Madonna of Einsiedeln. Over the years dust and the smoke of candles, oil lamps, and incense darkened the image. In 1803 the hands and face were painted black. Wikipedia.

Swiss reformer Huldrych Zwingli stayed in Einsiedeln for two years, during which time he focused on church activities and personal studies, including Greek and Hebrew.  Many of his reformation ideas began to germinate during those years prior to his move to Zürich to become the people’s priest of the Grossmünster church there.

History of the Einsiedoln Abbey (3:29)

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Tour of Daniel Haston Family Historic Sites

The Daniel Haston Family Historic Sites Tour

Saturday Afternoon, July 22, 2022

To see the highlighted route on a printed copy,
print in color or print in grayscale then highlight the route manually.
Click on the (right side) arrow to sequence through the sites on the tour.

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Some Lodging Options and Recreation Sites

Some Lodging Options and Recreational Sites

For the July 22-23, 2022 Heritage of Daniel Haston Days Week

Lodging and Recreation

Fall Creek Falls State Park

Fall Creek Falls

Fall Creek Falls State Park is one of Tennessee’s largest and most visited state parks. The park encompasses more than 29,800 acres sprawled across the eastern top of the rugged Cumberland Plateau. Laced with cascades, gorges, waterfalls, streams and lush stands of virgin hardwood timber, the park beckons those who enjoy nature at her finest. Fall Creek Falls, at 256 feet, is one of the highest waterfalls in the eastern United States. Other waterfalls within the park include Piney Falls, Cane Creek Falls, and Cane Creek Cascades.  Best for sight-seeing.

Very important to make lodging reservations as early as possible.

19.7 miles to Hickory Valley Baptist Church, 5865 Hickory Valley Road, Sparta, TN 38583.

Rock Island State Park

Rock Island State Park is an 883-acre park located on the headwaters of Center Hill Lake at the confluence of the Caney Fork, Collins and Rocky Rivers. The rugged beauty of the park includes the Caney Fork Gorge below Great Falls Dam. These overlooks are some of the most scenic and significant along the Eastern Highland Rim. Great Falls is a 30-foot horseshoe cascading waterfall, located below the 19th-century cotton textile mill that it powered over 100 years ago. Rock Island became a Tennessee State Park in 1969.  Nearest to Hickory Valley Church.

Very important to make lodging reservations as early as possible.

16.9 miles to Hickory Valley Baptist Church, 5865 Hickory Valley Road, Sparta, TN 38583.

Sligo Marina on Center Hill Lake

Sligo Marina on Center Hill Lake

Sligo Marina has Pontoon Boats available for half-day and full-Day rental. Double deck pontoon boats include a slide and have a 14 person limit. If you are looking for a place to store your boat at Center Hill Lake Sligo Marina has multiple options available. Slips available include covered and uncovered and can accommodate boat sizes ranging from jet ski’s to large pontoon boats. Marina has a launch ramp and nightly tie-ups are available. Electricity and water are available.  A rental cabin is a great way to spend the weekend at Center Hill Lake. The rustic rental cabins sleep six and include three full beds, two baths, kitchenette, and screened porch. The cabins overlook the lake and include a boat slip.  The Sligo Ship’s Store carries most common items needed for a day on the lake. There is also a gas island for boat refueling. If you are hungry after a day on the water stop by the Wheelhouse Restaurant for a great meal.  Best for serious fishing.

 Very important to make lodging reservations as early as possible.

25.5 miles from Hickory Valley Baptist Church, 5865 Hickory Valley Road, Sparta, TN 38583.

Lodging Only

Vacation Rentals by Owner

VRBO - Vacation Rental by Owner

Vrbo is an American vacation rental online marketplace originally known as Vacation Rentals by Owner or VRBO.

 Very important to make lodging reservations as early as possible.

Firefly Acres

Firefly Acres - 45 Acre Horse Farm.

Only 4.8 miles from Hickory Valley Church and adjacent to the original Daniel Haston farm.

Firefly Acres! I can’t say enough about this hidden gem!
We were looking for a cabin to stay in while visiting the Falls Creek Falls State Park and found this wonderful place. There are 4 different cabins on this beautiful secluded horse ranch. We stayed in the Tool Shed. The décor was amazing with, unexpected gems everywhere you looked. It had super comfortable beds, a small kitchen, bath and a wonderful covered deck overlooking the horse pasture. If all that wasn’t enough, the Owners, Pete and Bambi were amazing! After a wonderful day hiking we called ahead and let them know we wanted to have a fire. When we returned, the fireplace in the pavilion was all ready to go, all we had to do was light it and enjoy! -A review by an unknown guest

 Very important to make lodging reservations as early as possible.

Cookeville, TN Hotels

Cookeville, TN - Several Hotels

There is a Royal Inn in Sparta, but some of the reviews are not good.

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29 – Resolving the “McComisky Mystery” in the Daniel Haston Family

29 - Resolving the "McComisky Mystery" in the Haston Family

A common piece of erroneous family lore has circulated among Daniel Haston family members for many years–the assumption that Daniel’s son, David, was named “David McComisky Haston.”  You don’t have to look at many Haston family trees on Ancestry.com or other genealogy internet sites to see this assertion.  That incorrect notion was probably fueled by the now-debunked theory that our Hastons were Scots-Irish.  And some Haston folks have even incorrectly theorized that Daniel Haston must have married a McComisky woman at some point prior to the birth of his first son David.

But it is true that the McComisky name DOES appear in the early Haston family.  David and Margaret/Peggy Roddy Haston named their fourth child (second son, born 1808) “Daniel Haston.”  But the most interesting part of his name is the middle name: “McComisky” (or McComiskey, McCumskey, McCumskay, etc.).  How and why did this McComisky surname enter the Daniel Haston family?  In reading piles of correspondence between earlier Haston researchers, I have found that this was one of the most perplexing questions they sought (unsuccessfully) to answer. 

“I am especially intrigued by the name of the fourth child of the first David.
I’ve wondered why he happened to be named Daniel McComisky [Haston].”[i]
 

“Every time we get to a research center…we include the name McComisky
in our search.  So far, we have not found the name ….”[ii]

“…did you ever hear your dad say anything about how Daniel McComisky 
[Haston] got his name?  I am wondering about the McComisky ….”[iii]

 

[i] Source:  Personal letter to Mr. and Mrs. Dave R. Haston of Sparta, Tennessee from Sybaline Haston Edwards of Bridge City, Tennessee, June 2, 1973.

[ii] Personal letter from Mrs. Dave R. Haston to Sybaline Haston Edwards, June 14, 1973.

[iii] Personal letter from Mr. and Mrs. Dave R. Haston of Sparta, Tennessee to Maude ____, September 17, 1973.

The Clue that Unlocked the Mystery

Early in August 2000, Sherry Mirkovic discovered a Baltimore County, Maryland will that was created by Daniel McComisky who lived in Maryland in the late 1700s.  And this McComisky man had grandchildren in the Carolinas, which would have included Tennessee in September 1789, the time the will was created.  Subsequent online searches located a genealogy forum post by Beth Layman that documented a connection between this Daniel McComisky and a Philip Roddy family.   Philip Roddy lived in Randolph County, North Carolinas in the 1770s through the very early 1790s, then lived in East Tennessee in the 1790s and early 1800s.  That information led to Beth Layman’s book, Richard Green Waterhouse (1775-1827): Tennessee Pioneer, which added more details regarding this Knox County, Tennessee Roddy family and its connection to the Daniel McComesky family of Baltimore County, Maryland.  As it turned out, Philip Roddy married a daughter of Daniel McComisky–her name was Mary McComiskey Roddy.

We also learned that the Philip Roddy family was living near our Daniel Haston in Knox County, TN shortly before and after the turn of the 19th century–about 1795-1803.  And we learned that David Haston’s wife, Margaret (Peggy) Roddy was almost certainly the daughter of Philip and Mary McComisky Roddy.

Bingo!

Daniel’s grandson was named Daniel McComisky Haston.  The middle name came from his grandmother’s family, Mary McComisky (Roddy), daughter of Baltimore County, Maryland’s Daniel McComisky.  And Daniel Haston’s son, David Haston, was NOT named “David McComisky Haston!”  So, please correct your genealogy records if you have copied this erroneous assumption.

Location of Daniel McComisky's 447 Acres in Baltimore County, Maryland

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13 – Village of Hirzel, Home of Two Famous People

13 - Village of Hirzel, Switzerland - Home of Two Famous People

Our June 2023 Hiestand-Haston tour group will visit the little mountain village of Hirzel, Switzerland on Monday, June 19.

The village of Hirzel, just a few miles on the mountainside southwest of Richterswil is famous for its beauty, as well as the homes of two extraordinary Swiss people.  Johanna Spyri, the author of Heidi, is known internationally.  Hans Landis is famously known as a great hero of Swiss Anabaptist/Mennonite descendants.  Landis was the last Anabaptist martyred for his Christian faith. 

Johanna Spyri - Author of Heidi

Hans Landis - The Last Swiss Anabaptist Martyr

Home of Anabaptist Leader Hans Landis who was Martyred in 1614

Hans “The Martyr” Landis was a notable Anabaptist and was probably the most famous Landis. He gained notoriety by being the last martyr in Switzerland to be executed for his religious beliefs. “In the Ausbund, (oldest hymnbook of the Swiss Brethren ) No. 132, is a song of 46 stanzas commemorating his death.

After several imprisonments and escapes Hans was imprisoned in the Wellenberg tower which stood in the Limmat River in Zurich, Switzerland. The the tower is where the Swiss authorities decapitated Landis on September 30, 1614, for his leadership of the “heretical” Anabaptists and his refusal to leave his congregation.

Wellenberg Tower

Our Hiestand Anabaptist ancestors were associated with Hans Landis.  He may have been considered to have been their pastor. 

In fact, the earliest known reference to a Hiestand being an Anabaptist is May 10, 1613, when Hannsmann Hiestand, from Wädenswil, was mentioned in a letter along with Hans Landis.[i] 

[i] Kent D. Hiestand, “History that Happened to Hiestands,” The Grand Chronicle of the Hiestand Family, accessed October 1, 2017, http://hiestand.tripod.com/~Hiestand/chronik/TIJDLIJN.HTML.

See the location of Hirzel in relation to Richterswil and Wadenswil.

Lone Linden Trees on the Hills of Hirzel

Legend has it that the farmers on Hirzel sold their souls to the devil in return for more land. The devil took the easy way out and just pushed the earth up from inside. When the farmers realised the extra land was steep and of no great use, they felt cheated on and planted a linden tree on top of every hill. With the linden trees, being the “trees of love,“ the devil would avoid the area in the future.

The Lone Linden Trees on the Hills of Hirzel

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28 – David and Peggy Haston on Grassy Creek in Knox County, TN

28 - David Haston - Distinguishes Himself as a Young Adult

Adjacent to a 2020 $45 Million Development Project

At age 25, David Haston became the owner of 111 acres in Knox County, TN.  Apparently, owning land was not something his father (Daniel) achieved until his mid-50s.  In 2020, a $45 million project was developed southeast of the property David owned in 1802-1806.  In fact, the Grassy Creek Shopping Center overlaps David and Peggy’s property.

This image is upside down on purpose. Grassy Creek, in the upper-left corner was flowing through David Haston's property in 1802-1806.

I’m not sure what the difference was, but David Haston stood out among Daniel’s sons.  He apparently was fairly well educated for a young  man who grew up in a poor German-speaking family.  Like all of Daniel’s children, he undoubtedly was able to speak English and German.  And somewhere along the way he received a decent education for his time and place.  It’s only a guess on my part, but my theory is that he someway managed to be associated with some of the prominent people in Knoxville–perhaps even the earliest political and civic leaders in the little pioneer town that happened to be the capital of Tennessee.  Maybe he served as an aide to some of them–I don’t know.  But later, when he got to White County, Tennessee, he demonstrated civic leadership and land ownership–as well as lay leadership in the local Cumberland Presbyterian Church.  And in Knox County, he was the owner of 111 acres–with a creek flowing through his property–at the age of 25

September 1, 1801 – David and Peggy’s first child, Malinda, was born on this date somewhere in Knox County.

October 28, 1802Where did David and Peggy live the first couple of years of their marriage?  With David’s family?  With Peggy’s family?  Did they lease one of the Charter lots and live there or rent a place in Knoxville?  We will probably never know.  But for a young man from a poor family, David must have been quite industrious.  About two and a half years after he married, David became an owner of 111 acres on Grassy Creek, northwest of Knoxville.  

David purchased 111 acres from John Armstrong for $300 on this date.  The tract of land was located on the east fork of Grassy Creek in Hinds Valley, between Beaver Ridge and Blackoak (Black Oak) Ridge, about eight miles north west of Knoxville.[i]  Grassy Creek runs in a southwest direction on the west side of and parallel with Schaad Road through the Knoxville Golf Course, crosses Oak Ridge Highway (Route 62) and then is joined by other streams as it turns northwest and flows through the Cheneworth Gap of Beaver Ridge and meanders from there into Beaver Creek, a tributary of Clinch River.

[i] Knox County, Tennessee Real Estate Purchase, Original Book K, 79; Volume C, Volume 1, 300-301.

1803The name David Hasston appeared on an 1803 Knox County tax list.  He owned 111 acres on Grassey (Grassy) Creek and his household had one white poll.  He was in the Captain Childs (Chiles) Company.[i]  When the earliest settlers moved to that area, they found an abundance of tall grass “higher than a man’s head” in the valleys all the way to the foot of Clinch Mountain.”[i] 

[i] Nannie Lee Hicks, The John Adair Section of Knox County, Tennessee. (Knoxville, TN: The Nocturne Garden Club, 1968), 12.

[i] “Captain Childs Company,” Knox County, Tennessee 1803 Tax List.

January 22, 1804This was the birthdate of David and Peggy’s second child, Mary (“Polly”).

Mid-1805 – Sometime between the January and October Knox County Court terms, David Haston was an auctioneer for the estate sale of Jacob Neff who had died in the latter part of 1804.  Jacob Neff was a grandson of Dr. John Henry Neff who lived near the Hiestands in Virginia.  He may have been a nephew of Christina Nave.  If so, Jacob Neff and David Haston were first cousins.  But Jacob Neff’s wife was a Strickler whose family was closely connected to the Hiestands.

June 11, 1806 – David and Peggy’s third child, Willie B., was born before they sold their Grassy Creek land and moved to White County.  Willie’s middle initial apparently stood for Blount. 

Willie (pronounced “Wiley”) Blount (born 1768) was a half-brother of William Blount, the former governor of the Southwest Territory.  Willie studied law at the universities that later became Princeton and Columbia before serving as a private secretary for his brother, Governor Blount.  At the time Willie B. Haston was born, Willie Blount was living in Montgomery County, in north central Tennessee.  “Blount was elected governor in 1809 and then reelected in 1811 and 1813.”[i]  He was Governor of Tennessee during the War of 1812.

[i] Anne-Leslie Owens, “Willie Blount,” Tennessee Encyclopedia, accessed October 6, 2019, https://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/entries/willie-blount/.

To name a son after a popular politician was not unusual, but Willie Blount was not yet governor of Tennessee when David’s first son was born.  David Haston and Willie Blount lived in Knoxville for several years at the same time, which makes me wonder if David had some special connection with the future governor of Tennessee—special enough that David named his first-born son Willie Blount Haston.

September 11, 1806 – On this day, one day before White County was officially formed from Smith and Jackson Counties, David sold his Grassy Creek land in Knox County. David bought the land for $300 in October of 1802 and sold it for $490 in September of 1806, a 63% increase in price in four years.  

November 11, 1806 – The Jacob Neff estate was settled on this date.  Sometime prior to then, David Haston had been paid (by receipt) $1.00 for his part in the estate settlement.  But, by the time the estate was settled, David had already received his payment and may have been on the way to or in White County.

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12 – The Richterswil Museum (Canton Zurich, Switzerland)

The Richterswil Museum

In June 2023, while our Hiestand-Haston tour group is in Richterswil, Switzerland, we will have an opportunity to visit the local museum.

The Richterswil local museum deepens the understanding of regional history and promotes cultural life in the community.

 

The main points of his work are:

  • Management and expansion of the historical collection that is housed in the Haus zum Bären.
  • the organization of exhibitions showing part of the local history.
  • the publication of historical writings.
  • the organization of exhibitions in the field of art and culture in general.

The Richterswil local museum in the venerable “Haus zum Bären”, a stand construction from 1749, has a treasure trove of drawings and engravings from the 18th and 19th century, the age of tourism in the village. Old films, reports, pictures and photographs document the heyday of industry, industrialists, workers, manufacturing methods and village life. The museum houses the archive of the Zürichseezeitung from 1865. A pharmacy, a shoemaker’s workshop, a kitchen and music playback devices date from around 1900. Various very beautiful rooms are rented out for various occasions and exhibitions.  Opened in 1975

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27 – David Haston Marries 14-Year-Old Girl

27 - David Haston Married 14 Year Old "Peggy" Roddy

Yeah, I just created the title for the dramatic effect, but it was true. On May 5, 1800 (one day short of David Haston’s 23rd birthday) he was issued a marriage bond to marry Margaret “Peggy” Roddy in Knox County, Tennessee. Perhaps his bride was his 23rd birthday gift to himself, since the actual marriage often occurred a day after the bond was issued.

As you probably know by now, David Haston was Daniel’s oldest son. He was born in Shenandoah County, VA, probably up in Powell’s Fort Valley in the Massanutten Mountain where Daniel’s family lived for the first several years after his marriage to Christina Nave.

David’s bondsman for his marriage was Isham Bradley. As far as I can tell there was no familial relationship to Isham. He and David were probably just best buddies. David had been the bondsman for Isham Bradley’s wedding two years earlier to Susanna Matlock. And Isham Bradley followed the Hastons to Middle Tennessee a few years later.

Now, back to David Haston’s bride–Margaret “Peggy” Roddy. Yes, she was only 14 1/2 years old when she married 23 year old David! “Was that legal?,” you ask. Yes, in fact there was no legal statue regarding marriage ages in Tennessee until 1899! “Was that normal?,” you ask. Well, it wasn’t unusual. Men generally didn’t marry until they were old enough to establish themselves with a place to live and a job of some sort. And it was very common for girls to marry in their early teens. Anyway–it worked out fine because David and Peggy seem to have had a very good marriage, had 13 kids, raised some of their grandkids, and lived together 57 years until she died in 1857. How many husbands and wives today stay together until “death do us part,” 57 years of living?

David and Peggy Roddy Haston are my Great-Great-Great Grandparents and I’m very proud of them!

Who were Peggy’s parents? For who-knows-how-many-years, Haston family researchers have tried to find the answer to that question and have often “guessed” incorrectly that she was the daughter of Colonel James Roddy who lived in Jefferson County, TN. Not so, no way!.

Do you remember the story of David Haston cutting the cow tails off Nathaniel Hays’s horned cows? Peggy Roddy was the sister of three of the Roddy kids who were called to testify against David. Those kids were the children of Philip and Mary McComiskey Roddy who lived near Daniel Haston’s family, “south of the Holston River, opposite Knoxville.”

There is so much I have learned about this Philip Roddy family over the past 20 years! But I’ll hold that until a couple of articles later. Stay tuned!

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11 – Boat Cruise Around Lake Zürich

11 - Boat Cruise Around Lake Zürich

On Sunday afternoon, June 18, 2023 we enjoy a delightful cruise around Lake Zürich, seeing the towns along the shores and the Alps in the distance.  

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26 – Daniel Haston’s Many Experiences in the Knox County, TN Courtroom

26 - Daniel Haston's Many Experiences in the Courtroom

While Living in Knox County, TN

Page 205 of Legal Papers of Andrew Jackson by James W. Ely, Jr. and Theodore Brown, Jr.

When Daniel was a young man back in Shenandoah County, VA, he was conspicuously absent from court appearances of any kind, although his brothers were there often as witnesses, involved in court cases, or even sometimes as attorneys. Daniel, as far as we know, never served on a jury in Virginia.  When Daniel was in Washington County, NC/TN he may have served on one jury, but I’m not even sure about that juror.  He might have been our Daniel’s nephew, who was also named Daniel.

But in Knox County, TN in just 6 years and 4 months Daniel served as a jury member in at least 69 court cases! He may have served on juries more than any other Knox County citizen during that period.  Was he doing it for pay? No, at that time in Knox County there was no payment for jury duty!

In addition to jury duty–as we saw in the two previous posts, his sons David and Joseph were involved in a couple of court cases that proved to be insignificant. He was in court to support them.  On other occasions, Daniel was a witness. He was an estate administrator. He was a defendant. In another case he put up a security bond for a friend.

Daniel's Most Significant Court Appearances

in Knox County, Tennessee

April 20, 1795 – John Mattox vs. John Stone (In debt)

The first for-sure documented date we have for Daniel Haston’s appearance in Knoxville is this Knox County case in which Daniel was a bondsman for a friend.  Unfortunately for Daniel, his friend (apparently) deserted him, leaving Daniel financially responsible for the court costs and damages to be paid to the plaintiff.

[i] John Mattox vs. John Stone, Knox County, Tennessee Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Docket 383/378, 1795-1797.

April 29, 1797 - John Stone vs. Daniel Hastings (Scire Facias)

Scire Facias = Judicial writ requiring a person to appear in court and argue why a judgment against him should not be annulled, vacated, executed, or enforced.

This case goes back to a choice Daniel made on April 20, 1795, when he signed to be the security for John Mattox who took John Stone, a local tavern owner, to court.  It seems that Mattox may have fled the county to avoid paying damages and costs when he failed to prosecute his case against Stone and found himself in the role of defendant. 

This April 29, 1797 John Stone vs. Daniel Hastings case was summarized in these words:

The Defendant having been duly warned and not appearing though solemnly called On motion of the Plaintiff by his Attorney It is considered by the Court that the Plaintiff may have Execution against the Defendant for Thirteen Dollars twenty four and one half cents the costs in the writ aforesaid specified and also that the Plaintiff recover against the said Defendant his costs by him expended in suing forth and prosecuting this writ.  

Earlier, Daniel had been informed that he owed Stone $20.44½ and that he must return to court on April 24, 1797.  That was a Monday.  But when this case was presented on Saturday, April 29, 1797, it appears that Stone was willing to receive the lesser amount of $13.24½.  Or perhaps Daniel had already paid $7.20, but still owed the $13.24½.

April 12, 1798 - State vs. David Hasten (T V A)

This was the “cow tails” case presented in a previous article.  Trespass Vi et Armis = trespass with force and arms.

January 1800 – Appointed of Daniel Haston and Elizabeth Roddy as Estate Administrators

On motion of Elizabeth Roddy and Daniel Hastings Administrators is granted them on the estate of James Roddy deceased, who have been sworn, and entered into bond together with William Tipton and John Desmond (Jun.) in the sum of One Thousand Dollars with condition as law directs.[i]

[i] Knox County, Tennessee, Estate Settlements, Reel # 1 (Volume 1, July 1792 – October 1811), 74.

James Roddy, son of Philip Roddy, had married Elizabeth Haston in December 1793 in Washington County.

October 1800 - Samuel Cowan vs. Joseph Haston (T V A)

Trespass Vi et Armis = trespass with force and arms; quare clausum fregit = literally, “breaking a close” – meaning breaking a fence.  This was the “Timothy lot” case mentioned in a previous article.  The following signatures were 

Joseph Haston, Daniel Hastings, and David Haston signed a $2,000 bond to assure that Joseph would appear in court on the second Monday (13th) of October at the courthouse in Knoxville to answer Samuel Cowan’s accusations.  Joseph and David signed in their own handwriting, but Daniel made his mark.  As we gave seen previously, Daniel could have signed his first name in English and his surname in German, but maybe that was not allowed in Knoxville. 

October 7, 1801 - Hamilton District Court Case, Andrew Jackson vs. John Kearby

But one of the most interesting cases that Daniel was involved in was the Hamilton District Court Case, Andrew Jackson vs. John Kearby. Daniel was on the jury that heard and decided this case involving Andrew Jackson. OK, get this–Andrew Jackson was a litigant (he took Kearby to court). And Andrew Jackson was a judge on this case! Yep, he judged his own case!  Daniel Haston and the other jury members ruled against Kearby and in favor of Andrew Jackson’s complaint! But they only assessed Kearby six cents in damages and six cents in court costs. See the image for more about this case.  Yep – Daniel Haston was on a jury that tried a case involving a district court judge, who was a future War of 1812 hero and two-term President of the United States. See the image at the top of the page.

October 1801 - Nathaniel Hays vs. Solomon McCampbell and Paul Cunningham

On July 13, 1801, Daniel Haston was summoned to court in Knox County, Tennessee, along with John Cowan and James Cunningham.  They were called to witness on behalf of the defendant, Paul Cunningham, who was accused of trespassing on and destroying the property of Nathaniel Hays.  Sound familiar?  The case focused on a dispute regarding the property boundaries of Hays and Cunningham. 

Then it appears that Nathaniel Hays moved to Davidson County, Tennessee (near Nashville) before the trial was complete.  On January 15, 1802 he appeared in court and stated that “he has some time ago removed himself and family to Cumberland [middle Tennessee, east Nashville area]…”  Apparently, he had missed a court appearance, because of “owing to high waters which he has to cross he could not reach Knoxville till after the above cause was called for trial ….”

The Court dismissed the case and Hays was pressed to pay court costs.  The sheriff of Knox County sent notices in July 1802 and April 1803 to the sheriff of Davidson County to recover the court costs from Nathaniel Hays. 

The original document file contains a receipt for each of these men, signed by the recipients:  July 9, 1804:  William Haislet, Junior; July 9, 1804:  William Haislet, Senior; December 29, 1804:  John Cowan; August 6, 1806:  James Cunningham.

There is no receipt, in the file, for Daniel Haston/Hasting.  When compared to the Daniel Haston timeline for that era, it is possible or likely that Daniel Haston had moved to White County by the time payments were made.  Who knows if he ever received his $1.50?

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10 – The Richterswil Wilderness Trust

10 - The Wilderness Trust in Richterswil

That the Hiestands Have Been Members of for Many Centuries

On Sunday morning, June 18, 2023 we will worship – like our Anabaptist ancestors worshiped – in a Swiss forest on the hillside behind the town or Richterswil.  They met in secret there because they could be imprisoned or martyred for worshiping where they could be discovered.  We will worship there to remember what they endured for their Biblical faith.  The forest we will gather in has 100s of years of Hiestand-connected history.  Our guide, Ross Baughman, will tell you that story.

For 100s of Years Hiestands Have Been Partial Owners of the Wilderness Trust

From the earliest years of the community of Richterswil, perhaps predating the Swiss Confederation, “Richterswil included about 300 acres of wilderness trust land within its borders that were kept, profited from and passed on through the sons of their elder-most families.”[i]  The trust consisted of a forest on the north face of the old castle site and extended to the shore of Lake Zürich.  It is essentially a multi-family socialist venture that has endured for many centuries.

[i] J. Ross Baughman, A Lake Beneath the Crescent Moon, 41.

Although the trust is much older, the written charter of June 3, 1645 “spells out how each male descendant from these clans could automatically become a society member and share in the annual profits every April, provided that he was a blood descendant, not adopted, and remained a resident of Richterswil.”  When no male descendants remained for a family, the number of clans in the trust decreased and each remaining family gained from the shrinking pool. 

“From its beginning, the Richterswil Wilderness Trust enshrined nicknames for each of the clans that belonged to it, primarily as a way to distinguish them from others of the same name not considered close kin.  At the beginning of the 19th Century, a list transcribed in the trust record offered a ‘Cookiebaker’ Hiestand family.”[i]  In June of 1941, the secretary of the corporation “reported that a number of the old family nicknames had fallen into disuse because members had moved away or the inherited male lines had ‘ended up in oblivion.’”  The “Gogg” Hiestands was on the list of those family nicknames.[ii]

[i] J. Ross Baughman, A Lake Beneath the Crescent Moon, 75.

[ii] J. Ross Baughman, A Lake Beneath the Crescent Moon, 216.

Today the trust is known as Allmendkorporation, the Allmend Corporation. On April 27, 1999, the Allmend Corporation recorded 75 males as full members, including one Hiestand.  In the year 2000, twenty-one families remained in the trust, including Bachmann, Baumann, Lehmann, Strickler, and Hiestand.[i] 

[i] J. Ross Baughman, A Lake Beneath the Crescent Moon, 41.

1:34 Video

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25 – Another Haston Boy in Trouble – Joseph and the Broken-Down Fence

25 - Another of Daniel Haston's Boys in Trouble

Joseph and the Broken-Down Fence

OK, so this wasn't the actual fence that Joseph Haston tore down, but let's just pretend. Ok?

Let’s start with a couple of definitions, for those of you who may not know what “Timothy” is or a “close,” because this story is all about a “timothy close,” some hogs, and a son who was just following his father’s orders.  

If you grew up on a farm, you know what “timothy” is–it’s a kind of hay.  Timothy hay is high in fiber and generally is easy to digest. It tends to be more expensive than the other grass hays, but it is also higher in nutrients than other grass hays. It is used most often as cattle and horse feed.
         

“Close” is an old word used for a lot or a small field.  So, a “timothy close” was a lot where timothy hay was grown.

Samuel Cowan had a timothy hay lot adjacent to the lot that Daniel Haston’s family lived on “south of the Holston River, opposite Knoxville” in 1800. Cowan was an important man in Knoxville – he ran a mercantile store and was a big shot in the little pioneer village of Knoxville.

One day in the summer of 1800, Daniel Haston told his 20 year old son Joseph to tear the fence down that they (the Hastons) had built on their rented lot. So Joseph, being an obedient son (like ALL Haston sons!) did what his father told him. The only problem was that Daniel’s hogs got into Mr. Cowan’s timothy hay lot and trampled around in it.

So on August 14, 1800, Samuel Cowan filed a complaint against Joseph and hired Hugh White as his attorney to prosecute Joseph Haston. Who was Hugh White? Later, he would become a Tennessee Supreme Court Justice, a U.S. Senator, and an 1836 candidate for President of the United States (he won Tennessee by a landslide, but lost to Martin Van Buren).

27 Seconds Video

Daniel (Joseph’s father) and David (Joseph’s brother) signed a $2,000 bond assuring that Joseph would show up for the trial. Cowan was asking for $1,000 for the damages. Gulp!

Sheriff Robert Houston was called as a witness for Joseph, as well as the owner’s agent for the lot Daniel was renting, James Charter. Drury W. Breazeale was Joseph’s attorney.  After both attorneys presented their cases, the jury:

who being elected, tried and sworn the truth to speak upon the issues joined upon their oath do say the Defendant is not guilty as in pleading he hath alleged.

Furthermore: Therefore it is considered by the Court that the Plaintiff take nothing by his Writ but for his false clamor be in Mercy etc and that the Defendant go thereof without day and recover against the Plaintiff his cost by him about his defense in this behalf expected.

Oh, by the way, Samuel Cowan died about a year later.

Joseph Haston and his attorney “bested” Hugh Lawson White, one of the most famous attorneys in early Tennessee and a future U.S. Presidential candidate!

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9 – The Old Wädenswil Castle in Richterswil, Canton Zurich of Switzerland

9 - The 13th-16th Century Wädenswil Castle Above Richterswil

Alt-Wädenswil Castle, the residence of the barons von Wädenswil, was inaugurated in the 13th century. The castle had to be demolished in 1557 according to a decision of the Diet, as Schwyz felt threatened by the expansion of the city-state of Zurich. 

Our Hiestand Ancestors Were Connected to this Castle

On Sunday, June 18, 2023 – This is what we’ll see and experience.

Before 1557

Alt-Wädenswil Castle, the residence of the barons von Wädenswil, was inaugurated in the 13th century. The castle had to be demolished in 1557 according to a decision of the Diet, as Canton Schwyz felt threatened by the expansion of the city-state of Zurich. 

21st Century

Perspectives

And we'll have a picnic on the castle grounds.

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